10 Best Places To Visit In Ireland

Ireland is one of those places where you can experience a fast city life and also be immersed in the calm and serenity that this island offers. So are you planning a visit to Ireland soon? If yes, read on to find out what are the best places that you can visit in Ireland. And if not, you might be tempted to visit this enchanting paradise once you read this interesting piece.

The Cliffs of Moher

The Cliffs of Moher

1. The Cliffs of Moher

If you want to get lost in nature's beauty, then the stunning Cliffs of Moher, stretching southwards for nearly 5 miles, is the best place to visit in Ireland. They offer an undiluted beautiful landscape, almost 700 feet above the sea. On clear days, you can see up to Kerry mountains and the 12 Bens of Connemara from the O'Brien Tower which was built by Sir Cornelius O'Brien in 1835.


Photo Courtesy: IrishFireside

Glendalough

Glendalough

2. Glendalough

Glendalough is a lush green valley which nestles two massive glacial lakes. It means 'the valley of the two lakes'. Situated not far from the capital Dublin, Glendalough is a visitor's delight. You can also see many buildings around the site like a cathedral, stone churches, the ruins of a cashel which means a ring fort and other Celtic remains. There's also a 34-meter round tower built around the 11th century which is another site worth seeing.


Photo Courtesy: andrewcparnell

Temple Bar

Temple Bar

3. Temple Bar

A guarantee of the Temple Bar is that you will never get bored there, for there are so many exciting things to do and see over there. The Temple Bar actually includes various special Dublin properties alongside the river Liffey (in Ireland, bar refers to a riverside path)and this land was once owned by Sir William Temple, hence the name. It prospered in the 1960s with restaurants, pubs, galleries and shops after a steady decline. It still holds on to its archaic charm and impresses tourists with its quaint ambiance.


Photo Courtesy: Olivier Bruchez

Bunratty Castle and Folk Park

Bunratty Castle and Folk Park

4. Bunratty Castle and Folk Park

Lovers of history and architecture will be truly delighted when they visit the Bunratty Castle and Folk Park. The Folk Park boasts 26 acres of land which has medieval style setting and furniture. You can even call it a theme park for it includes reproductions of Irish cottages and similar structures and scenes from the Victorian age. But the Castle is the focus point of Brunatty which was built around 1425 and has hand carved furnishing and tapestries.


Photo Courtesy: jmenard48

The Old Jameson Distillery

The Old Jameson Distillery

5. The Old Jameson Distillery

Whiskey lovers will have a field day with this one! The Old Jameson Distillery is now a renovated museum, conducting tours on how the Jameson brand was created and how it became one of the most renowned and loved whiskey in the world. You also have a surprise at the end of the tour in the form of a whiskey tasting session!


Photo Courtesy: Olivier Bruchez

Dublin Castle

Dublin Castle

6. Dublin Castle

Built in the 13th-century, the Dublin Castle served as a prison, treasury, military fortress, court of law and the seat of the English Administration for around 700 years in Ireland. Perfect place to visit for a history buff, isn't it? The castle has been torn down and rebuilt many times, yet it has a medieval feel to it. The guided tours of the castle, which last for an hour, will let you have a look at the State Apartments, the Undercroft, the Chapel Royal, the Heritage Centre and other important places in the castle. You can also find some really good souvenirs in the craft shop located here and feast on a delectable Irish meal at the restaurant.


Photo Courtesy: infomatique

The Giant's Causeway

The Giant's Causeway

7. The Giant's Causeway

A UNESCO World Heritage Site since 1986, the Giant's Causeway is a geological formation as a result of the volcanic eruptions around 50-60 million years ago. It is a remarkable landscape consisting of 40,000 basalt columns that protrude in to the sea.


Photo Courtesy: Andrew_D_Hurley

Boyne Valley Complex

Boyne Valley Complex

8. Boyne Valley Complex

Brú na Bóinne (the Boyne Palace) is home to many historical monuments and sites. It's also a UNESCO World Heritage Site. There are megalithic passage tombs here of Newgrange, Knowth and Dowth which are older than the Stonehenge in England as well as the Pyramids of Giza in Egypt.


Photo Courtesy: MllePeterson

Aran Islands

Aran Islands

9. Aran Islands

Situated near the Galway bay, Aran islands is the cumulative name of the 3 small islands - Inishmór, Inishmaan and Inisheer. A visit to this place will take you back in time as people there have still preserved their culture and prefer to lead a simple life. It has several natural attractions, forts, a castle and an ancient church that are a must visit.


Photo Courtesy: hostelmanagement

The Burren

The Burren

10. The Burren

The Burren is a rocky place made of limestone rock and soil, which provides a beautiful view. This place was formed in the last ice age as a result of glacial action. It's a wilderness that includes hillsides of limestone, cliffs, valleys, streams and lovely beaches.


Photo Courtesy: sedoglia

  • The Cliffs of Moher
  • Glendalough
  • Temple Bar
  • Bunratty Castle and Folk Park
  • The Old Jameson Distillery
  • Dublin Castle
  • The Giant's Causeway
  • Boyne Valley Complex
  • Aran Islands
  • The Burren

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