7 Wonders of the Ancient World

We all know and some of us have even seen the seven wonders of the modern world. Now we give you an insight into the lesser known, the seven wonders of the ancient world.

The Pyramids of Giza, Egypt

The Pyramids of Giza, Egypt

1. The Pyramids of Giza, Egypt

Built in about 2,600 B.C., the pyramids are actually the tombs of Egyptian pharaohs and the only ancient wonders that are still standing. They are a group of three huge pyramids namely Khufu, Khafra, and Menkaura. Located outside modern Cairo, the largest amongst these is 450 feet high and has 2,300,000 blocks. The average weight of each block is approximately 2.5 tons.


Photo Courtesy: PublicDomainPictures

Hanging Gardens of Babylon, Iraq

Hanging Gardens of Babylon, Iraq

2. Hanging Gardens of Babylon, Iraq

It is believed that these were built around 600 BC by Nebuchadnezzar to please his queen, Amytis. However, there are several legends that state that the Assyrian Queen Semiramis built them during her reign that began in 810 BC. A Greek geographer first explained that these gardens had vaulted terraces raised one above another. They rested upon cube-shaped pillars. There are also theories to suggest that these never existed.


Photo Courtesy: Maj. Mike Feeney

Statue of Zeus, Greece

Statue of Zeus, Greece

3. Statue of Zeus, Greece

Built in the 5th century B.C. by Athenian sculptor Phidias, this was a 40-feet (12-meter) statue made of gold and ivory. Later, the statue was moved to a palace in Constantinople (present-day Istanbul, Turkey). However, due to a severe fire in the palace, the statue was completely destroyed.


Photo Courtesy: Maarten van Heemskerck

Temple of Artemis at Ephesus, Turkey

Temple of Artemis at Ephesus, Turkey

4. Temple of Artemis at Ephesus, Turkey

Built to honor the Greek goddess of the hunt, Artemis, this towering temple was made in the 6th century B.C. This amazing marble structure had iconic columns that were 60 feet high. It also had a tile-covered wooden roof and was one of the most complex temples built in the ancient times. However, in 262 A.D., the temple was destroyed by the invading Goths.


Photo Courtesy: Dennis Jarvis

Colossus of Rhodes, Greece

Colossus of Rhodes, Greece

5. Colossus of Rhodes, Greece

In the 4th century B.C., a 110-feet statue was built to honor the Greek Sun god, Helios. It took the Greek sculptor Chares and his shop around 12 years to make this huge bronze statue. It was almost as high as the modern day Statue of Liberty. After about 56 years of its completion, a major earthquake destroyed it completely.


Photo Courtesy: wikipedia

Mausoleum at Halicarnassus, Turkey

Mausoleum at Halicarnassus, Turkey

6. Mausoleum at Halicarnassus, Turkey

This 135-feet high tomb was built to hold the remains of King Mausolus and his wife, Artemisia. Built in 4th century B.C., this enormous white marble structure was designed by Greek architects Satyrus and Pythius. In the early 15th century, the monument was destroyed by an earthquake. It was eventually disassembled and only the foundation and some of the pieces remain.


Photo Courtesy: wikimedia

Lighthouse of Alexandria, Egypt

Lighthouse of Alexandria, Egypt

7. Lighthouse of Alexandria, Egypt

Built in the 3rd century B.C., this was the world's first lighthouse to use mirrors to reflect sunlight out to sea. Sostratus of Cnidus made this 400-feet high lighthouse on the island of Pharos, off the coast of Egypt. Upon its completion, it was one of the tallest structures on Earth. It was destroyed in the 14 century A.D. by an earthquake.


Photo Courtesy: wikipedia

TAGS: egypt, greece, iraq, travel advice, travel tips, More